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Design For Health

Visually Interesting HIAs

Those giving presentations mentioning HIAs are often looking for good visuals to go in the presentations. The Design for Health web site now has a list of visually interesting HIAs at  http://www.designforhealth.net/resources/hiaexamples.html#vih (compiled by Inna Kitaychik). Some have photos but many have maps, plans, graphs, and charts. 

Page Ave HIA was led by Christy Hoehner and Jodi Polzin.
It is one of the visually interesting HIAs highlighted on th
DFH web site.

UN Habitat Reports on Health

UN Habitat produces and distributes a large number of reports, many related to health with numerous publications on water infrastructure, social inclusion, disaster management, housing issues, and climate change. Although you can buy printed reports that isn’t always necessary as many can be found for free.

Hidden Cities: Unmasking and Overcoming Health Inequities in Urban Settings (2010), produced in collaboration with the World Health Organization, provides a good overview of the history and current situation in terms of cities and health. Topics cange across the natural and build environment, social and conomic issues, food secutiy, health services, and general urban governange http://www.unhabitat.org/pmss/listItemDetails.aspx?publicationID=3049
Diagram from Hidden Cities
Collection of Municipal Solid Waste , Key issues for Decision-makers in Developing Countries (2011) grapples with an important problem in public health. Written in a very accessible style it answers practical questions about how too extend solid waste collection to a wider population. http://www.unhabitat.org/pmss/listItemDetails.aspx?publicationID=3231
A Global Assessment on Women’t Safety (2008) focuses on tools for enhancing safety including public education, adviacey, participatory approaches, and changing public spaces. It’s part of a series of reports on this topic http://www.unhabitat.org/pmss/listItemDetails.aspx?publicationID=2848

What’s in a Name?

 

Plan available directly from the
City of Bloomington
Recently, I was looking at the Pew Health Impact Project web site and noticed a featured HIA: the Xcel Energy Corridor: http://www.healthimpactproject.org/resources#reports
This is an excerpt from a plan featured on the Design for Health web site (one of the 19 Minnesota communities in Phase 1 of the project). On Design for Health site it is listed under the place name (Bloomington) and plan name (Alternative Transportation Plan) at http://www.designforhealth.net/cases/bloomington.html

Whatever the name it’s great to have these examples featured in multiple places.

Visuals: What Does a Rapid HIA Look Like?

This blog has dealt earlier with the logistics of doing an HIA but what does a workshop look like? One source is the Arden Hills Healthy City Planning Workshop Summary Report Appendices. This document contains images of each stage of the half-day workshop. Go to http://designforhealth.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/cases/HIA_ArdenHills_Appendices_3June2010.pdf and look at pages 33-36. More information about the process is available at: http://designforhealth.net/cases/ardenhillsworkshop.html.

Images from Arden Hills workshop. Photos: Design for Health.

 

How to Do a Rapid Health Impact Assessment: Useful Reports

The Rapid Health Impact Assessment—the kind of HIA that takes the form of a structured workshop with substantial preparation and reporting—boasts a number of detailed manuals, such as the classic by Erica Ison: http://www.apho.org.uk/resource/item.aspx?RID=44890.

Arden Hills Healthy City Planning Workshop
Photo: Ann Forsyth
However, moving beyond such general guidance it can be hard to find out how others have conducted their HIAs. Some people provide extensive background reports but not much about what actually happened at the workshops. Others focus on the outcomes of the HIA and not the inputs and process. An increasing number of practitioners are, however, reporting on HIAs in straightforward ways that provide transferrable tools for others. This entry highlights several of these, all containing useful examples of worksheets, maps, and recommendation checklists or tables.
  • The London Olympics HIA, completed in 2004 is an example of a health impact assessment conducted on a major employment and housing development. Prepared by consultant for the London Health Commission and the London Development Agency, the HIA had two parts: a desktop assessment using many existing reports and a workshop with 21 key participants (including advocates, government representatives, academic and academics). The HIA looked at construction, operation, and post games time periods and the consultant produced a 155 page report, available online: http://www.apho.org.uk/resource/view.aspx?RID=61057. This comprehensive report contains substantial background information, results from exercises in the workshop including some interesting voting activities, and clear recommendations.
  • The Lowry Corridor HIA of 2007, while an internally conduced assessment rather than a true participatory HIA, is a terrific resource. Focusing on the redevelopment of a major road in Minneapolis, the report contains several well thought-out worksheets and a number of interesting maps: http://www.apho.org.uk/resource/item.aspx?RID=60512. It is a very accessible document.
  • Commerce City, Derby Redevelopment Area HIA is also not a traditional rapid HIA but it is included here for its imaginative use of participation and analysis tools. These range from computer mapping and proposals for street redesign to photos taken by residents and stills from a video produced by local high school students. Located in a lower income, majority Latino area of suburban Denver the HIA was conducted by the Tri-County Health Department who in turn employed short-term consultants on special topics. With a focus on physical activity and nutrition, recommendations from the 65- page report (http://www.tchd.org/pdfs/hia_final.pdf) fed into a master plan.
  • The Arden Hills Healthy City Planning Workshop of 2010 assessed options for reusing a military facility in a suburb of the Twin Cities. The state Department of Health sponsored this HIA collaborated with the City of Arden Hills, hiring a consultant to actually conduct it (Design for Health). This is one of the very few HIA reports that includes basically all the information used to run and report on the HIA workshop–the actual information packet provided to participants in advance; the agenda of the meeting, copies of handouts, worksheets, and presentations from the workshops; a series of photos keyed to parts of the agenda; and the workshop’s summary report. The summary report and appendices, along with a description of the workshop, are online: http://designforhealth.net/cases/arden-hills-2010-workshop/.
  • More information about HIA in general can be found at http://designforhealth.net/hia/.
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